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Assignment | Nature vs Nurture Paper (Aguilar): APA Writing & Citing

Fall 2018 | PSYC 2314 | Prof. Aguilar

Developing Your Thesis

Your thesis is where you put forward your argument in a concise, declarative way. It is typically one sentence long and comes at the end of your introduction paragraph. You should only develop your thesis after you've started doing your research. You can have a thesis in mind as you start your research, of course, but be prepared to change it if you find it's unsupportable with the information available to you.

Thesis statements should be:

  • Specific - lay out exactly the arguments/reasons you're using in your thesis
  • Contestable - if you can find a definitive yes/no answer within a few minutes of Google searching, it's not arguable enough
  • Narrow - not about all of privacy ever, but this little sliver of a privacy issue in this particular time and society
  • Provable - or at least something you can persuasively argue.

The Set-Up

The APA-style research paper contains a title page, an abstract, the body of the paper, and references: the shortest paper possible using full APA style will be 4 pages long. Each page contains a running head with page numbers.

APA paper components

Headings


APA Style has a headings system to separate and identify paper sections. There are 5 heading levels with the top level always starting a     paper. The levels consist of a particular font format and type placement. See examples.

Image of Heading placement on APA paper

Image retrieved from Purdue Owl Writing Center

Example Citations

General Format:

Author Surname, First Initial. (date). Title of article written like a sentence. Name of Journal, vol(issue), page range. DOI or URL

Example (Reference page):

Szymczak, H., Kücükbalaban, P., Lemanski, S., Knuth, D., & Schmidt, S. (2016). Trusting Facebook in crisis situations: The role of general use and general trust toward Facebook. Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, 19(1), 23-27. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2015.0450

Example (In-text citation):

(Szymczak, Kücükbalaban, Lemanski, Knuth, & Schmidt, 2016, p. 25)

Nota bene:

APA Style doesn't care about date of access or what website or database you found your scholarly article through! If your article doesn't have a DOI (Digital Object Identifier), you can instead include the homepage for the journal that published. If that cannot be located, you can include the homepage of the database used as a last resort.

If the above example did not have a DOI, we'd search for the journal (Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking), and the citation would look instead like:

Szymczak, H., Kücükbalaban, P., Lemanski, S., Knuth, D., & Schmidt, S. (2016). Trusting Facebook in crisis situations: The role of general use and general trust toward Facebook. Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, 19(1), 23-27. http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/cyberpsychology-behavior-brand-social-networking/10/

What's a periodical?

Periodicals are things published on a "periodic" basis -- daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, etc. These examples cover online magazines, newspapers, and other websites you may cite.

General Format:

Author Surname, First Initial. (date). Title of article written like a sentence. Name of Newspaper/Magazine/Site, Publisher. Retrieved from URL

Example (Reference page):

Dahl, Melissa. (2018, Feb. 13). Why trying to be less awkward never works. The New York Times. Retrieved from https://nyti.ms/2BoCbMJ

Example (In-text citation):

(Dahl, 2018).

APA Resources

APA Online Guide

Additional help online:

Grammarly

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