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Assignment | Nature vs Nurture Paper (Aguilar): Getting Started

Fall 2018 | PSYC 2314 | Prof. Aguilar

Your Assignment

Lifespan and Development Research Paper

When it comes to child development, there have been many debates on how nature, nurture, or a combination of both affect a child’s development. You will write a 5-6 page APA paper that will analyze how both the environment (nurture) and genetics (nature) can either have a positive or negative effect on a child. Once you choose a topic, your goal will be to debate both sides of the argument (nature vs. nurture). For example, if you choose physical development as your topic, you will need to choose at least two theories/arguments that support how nature (theory/argument #1) and nurture (theory/argument #2) influence a child’s physical development. You will also include a case study/child example that will support one of your theories/arguments discussed. You can include a personal example if one of the children below does not apply to your topic.

For complete details click on the file below.

Picking a Topic IS Research

Doing Your Background Research

Once you have a topic in mind, you need to get acquainted with it. Illustrated couple on dateThink of it like going on a date: you're trying to get to know the other person (your topic) without scaring them off because you're trying to talk about marriage, houses, and grandkids (i.e. your "real" research) on the first date. And, of course, once you've gotten to know them better, you're able to buy them gifts and guess what they would like, because you've taken the time to establish those little basic details.

Benefits of Background Research

  • Illustration icon of thinking personCONTEXT! You can't really speak coherently about the impact of the automobile on society if you aren't also aware of what the horse-drawn carriage society was like, what the state of manufacturing was like, the purchasing power of the auto's target demographic, and so on.
  • You learn the JARGON. Scholarly articles are written by experts, for experts. They don't usually take the time to remind their readers what a term or process means, since the assumption is the readers already know. This can also present a barrier to finding those articles, as well. What's a non-expert to do? You've got to learn to speak the language of the field.
  • IDEA DEVELOPMENT! Let your research help you do research. As you're learning about the context and picking up on new terminology, you'll also be noticing key people, places, and events that relate to your topic... all of which will help you delve into your deeper research more effectively.

Where To Do It:

Your textbook is helpful at this stage, for starters.

Honestly? This is the time resources that are otherwise verboten are useful. You know... Wikipedia, Shmoop, or even just whatever comes up when you Google for your topic. These are not the sources you're going to cite in the end -- you just need them to give you ideas in a simple and straightforward way.

If you want an option like Wikipedia but better, check out Credo Reference (linked below). It provides short synopsis articles from reputable encyclopedias, and even has a mind map tool to help you visualize how topics relate to each other.

Reference Librarian

Weslia Smith's picture
Weslia Smith
Contact:
281-401-5390 (reference desk)

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