Skip to main content

Assignment | Annotated Bibliography (Pena): Getting Started

Spring 2019 | ENGL 1302 | Prof. Pena

Choose Your Own Topic assignment header

Your Assignment

Research To Do List:

 

What should your sources do for you?

  • Provide details and specifics about the problem you've selected
    • It might not be specifically about your locale, but you may be able to apply it and make your connections for why e.g. flooding in Connecticut is similar to flooding in Houston.
      • In which case, you may need an additional source or sources to give you comparative data about the two locations to better make that comparison.
  • Provide one or more ideas for solutions
  • Analysis of solutions -- why they would work, why they're possibly incomplete

Picking a Topic IS Research

Doing Your Background Research

First, you need to get acquainted with your topic. Illustrated couple on dateThink of it like going on a date: you're trying to get to know the other person (your topic) without scaring them off because you're trying to talk about marriage, houses, and grandkids (i.e. your "real" research) on the first date. And, of course, once you've gotten to know them better, you're able to buy them gifts and guess what they would like, because you've taken the time to establish those little basic details.

Benefits of Background Research

  • Illustration icon of thinking personCONTEXT! You can't really speak coherently about the impact of the automobile on society if you aren't also aware of what the horse-drawn carriage society was like, what the state of manufacturing was like, the purchasing power of the auto's target demographic, and so on.
  • You learn the JARGON. Scholarly articles are written by experts, for experts. They don't usually take the time to remind their readers what a term or process means, since the assumption is the readers already know. This can also present a barrier to finding those articles, as well. What's a non-expert to do? You've got to learn to speak the language of the field.
  • IDEA DEVELOPMENT! Let your research help you do research. As you're learning about the context and picking up on new terminology, you'll also be noticing key people, places, and events that relate to your topic... all of which will help you delve into your deeper research more effectively.

Where To Do It:

Honestly? This is the time resources that are otherwise verboten are useful. You know... Wikipedia or even just whatever comes up when you Google for your topic. These are not the sources you're going to cite in the end -- you just need them to give you ideas in a simple and straightforward way.

If you want an option like Wikipedia but better, check out Credo Reference (linked below). It provides short synopsis articles from reputable encyclopedias, and even has a mind map tool to help you visualize how topics relate to each other.

Learn More

Get Ideas for Topics

Develop Your Thesis

Your thesis is where you put forward your argument in a concise, declarative way. It is typically one sentence long and comes at the end of your introduction paragraph. You should only develop your thesis after you've started doing your research. You can have a thesis in mind as you start your research, of course, but be prepared to change it if you find it's unsupportable with the information available to you.

Thesis statements should be:

  • Specific - lay out exactly the arguments/reasons you're using in your thesis
  • Contestable - if you can find a definitive yes/no answer within a few minutes of Google searching, it's not arguable enough
  • Narrow - not about all of privacy ever, but this little sliver of a privacy issue in this particular time and society
  • Provable - or at least something you can persuasively argue.